BURNOUT, JOB SATISFACTION, SELF-EFFICACY, AND PROACTIVE COPING AMONG LITHUANIAN SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGISTS

Renata Mackonienė, Natalija Norvilė

Abstract


Burnout occurs in occupations, such as psychologists, where a significant proportion of time is spent in close involvement with other people. This article focuses on examining the prevalence of burnout, job satisfaction, self-efficacy, and proactive coping and identifying the correlates of burnout among Lithuanian school psychologists. A descriptive correlational design was used to collect data from school psychologists using the Oldenburg Burnout Inventory, Minnesota Satisfaction Questionnaire (short-form), General Self-Efficacy Scale, Proactive Coping Inventory, and demographic and work-related variables through a self-reported questionnaire. The sample consisted of 115 school psychologists (113 females and 2 males) recruited from 19 cities and small towns in Lithuania. Lithuanian school psychologists showed moderate levels of disengagement and moderate levels of exhaustion. Score on job satisfaction was moderate; score on the external job satisfaction was high, and moderate on internal job satisfaction. Scores of self-efficacy and proactive coping were slightly higher than the midrange. Significant correlations were found among burnout categories, job satisfaction, self-efficacy, and age. Predictor variables accounted for 22.2 % of disengagement, and 21.5 % of exhaustion. Continued research on the correlates of burnout and factors that best predict burnout dimensions is critical to developing better understanding and improving strategies for preventing and reducing its incidence among school psychologists.

KEY WORDS: burnout, job satisfaction, self-efficacy, proactive coping, school psychologists.


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